Handling Questions after you give the Oral Presentation

 

        Many presentations end with a question-and-answer period that gives the audience an opportunity to get more of the information they want.

 

        You need to be prepared for questions, just as you do for the rest of the presentation.

        In preparing for your speech, imagine questions that the audience may have and prepare answers. Rehearse answering questions, just as you would the speech itself.

 

        However, it is likely that there will be some questions you cannot answer immediately. There might even be some questions you should not answer immediately.

        Don't feel obligated to answer everything "of the top of your head."

        If you are a question that you are ready (or willing) to answer, you can respond with something like: "That's an important question and a difficult on, and I shouldn't try to answer it without giving it some thought, and perhaps some research. If you'll give me your name and address later, I'll be able to send you a response to your question." In this manner, you can usually postpone or deflect questions you don't want to answer immediately.

 

        After you answer the question(s), it is a good idea for you to have the last word and leave the focus on the most important point you had to make in your speech (i.e., conclusion).

 

What if there are no questions?

        If you are comfortable with there being no questions, you can simply close the presentation with a simple restatement of your conclusion.

        Even if there are questions, it is a good idea for you to have the last word and leave the focus on the most important point you had to make in your speech (i.e., conclusion).

 

 

 

* This information was based on Public Speaking for Dummies by Malcolm Kushner.

* Prepared by Ms. Dyanne Lynne